The Taransay is an example of yachting history being brought back to life. The first Taransay was built in 1929 in Scotland by the new-defunct Hall Russel & Co. The original Taransay had a long career, eventually being retired and scrapped in 1952. The latest Taransay was built in 2015 by Italian firm Rossinavi still carries some old-fashioned design choices, such as the large, warship-like smoke stack and the masts that would be used when not under steam or coal power.

The Taransay we have today is a replica of the old one, but the designers haven’t skimped on modern naval technology or comfort. The wheel room is much more spacious and modern then its historical counterpart. In general, the ship’s galley, cabin and crew areas are larger which means it can accommodate more people over a long distance.

The Taransay can carry up to 10 guests in 5 rooms, with 1 VIP stateroom, 1 master suite and 3 twin cabins. Alongside her guests, she can carry 7 crewmen. However, this isn’t yet another carbon fibre yacht. It’s fitted as though it just sailed out of a time portal to the early 20th century. The Taransay is clad in wood all over, with beautifully antiquated furnishings that may look out of place in 2017, but will certainly appeal to those with a taste for the aesthetic of the Roaring Twenties.

The Taransay is available during summer with access to all the sights and sounds of the Mediterranean for 84000 dollars, plus expenses.

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